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Archive for the ‘photography’ Category

Crop of the new

In exhibition, painting, photography on 19 August 2009 at 1:30 am

Three interesting shows featuring emerging artists open tomorrow around Darlinghurst in Sydney.

Kill PixieKill Pixie

At Monster Children Gallery (20 Burton St [map]), a two-man show by Kill Pixie and Cleon Peterson called The Mirror Stage. A former Sydney graffiti artist, Kill Pixie (aka Mark Whalen) now works out of Los Angeles, where his disctinctively coloured, delicate line drawing are in high demand from collectors and savvy magazine editors. Cleon Peterson is also from LA, well known for his paintings of a world where random acts of violence are the status quo. The exhibition runs until 17 September.

Cleon PetersonCleon Peterson

Anton Benoisstreet work by Anton Benois

Around the corner at Palmer Projects (238 Palmer St [map]), new works by Anton Benois and Esjay go on show under the title Bad Influence. Benois’ work is influenced by Soviet-era propaganda of his native Russia, with icons from pop culture mingling with faces from history. Painter, illustrator and designer esjay is also showing new works. The show runs until 26 August. Read the rest of this entry »

50 years of Australian fashion: inside the Bruno Benini archive

In fashion, photography on 12 July 2009 at 4:07 pm

Benini 1

Bruno Benini was a pioneering Australian fashion photographer, bringing a European elegance to the field from the post-war period right through until his death in 2001. Together with his wife, Hazel, who played an important role in styling the photos, the Beninis were central, glamorous figures in Melbourne’s cultural scene for 50 years, documenting not just fashion through his commercial work, but also leading players in the world of arts and entertainment through portraits.

Photo N¼: 00x11085Left: Pauline Kiernan in a strapless evening sheath by Theo Haskin of Salon Milano, 1956. Right: Bambi Shmith (Patricia Tuckwell) in Hall Ludlow’s ‘Magpie’ tunic, 1957

His body of work was recently acquired by Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum. Design and Society curator, Anne-Marie Van de Ven, targeted the archive for acquisition back in 1996. “I knew it documented post-war dress design and manufacture,” she says. “What delights me is the scope and depth of photographic representation of the clients, like Ninette and Solo, and the models like Janice Wakely, Maggie Tabberer, Jan Stewart, Nerida Piggin and Maggi Eckardt.”

Benini 3Curator Anne-Marie Van de Ven with part of the Benini archive still in its shipping crate. Read the rest of this entry »

Wounds in the land: Edward Burtynsky’s photographs of Australian mines

In photography on 10 July 2009 at 11:56 am

minescapes_03Super Pit #4, Kalgoorlie, Western Australia

Calling this series “landscapes” or “minescapes” is too gentle to encompass what they depict. Edward Burtynsky’s photographs of Western Australian mines are woundscapes, evidence of the lasting and often devastating impact our demand for raw materials has on the land.

minescapes_02Silver Lake Operations #15, Lake Lefroy, Western Australia

Burtynsky’s images, commissioned for the FotoFreo 2008 Festival, show the rarely seen scale and effects of mining. (Take a look, for instance, at this satellite view of the Hunter Valley to see the surface mining not seen by wine-tasting visitors.)

“Our dependence on nature to provide the materials for our consumption and our concern for the health of our planet sets us into an uneasy contradiction,” he says. “For me, these images function as reflecting pools of our times.” Read the rest of this entry »

Heads up – five diary dates for Sydney Design 09

In architecture, exhibition, festival, graphic design, industrial design, photography on 29 June 2009 at 7:12 am
While the Sydney Design 09 festival (1–16 August) is still more than a month away, I wanted to give you advance notice of a couple of ticketed events that will sell out quickly, and some more to consider for your diary.
English lighting designer Paul Cocksedge http://www.paulcocksedge.co.uk/ is known for innovations like lights that can be switched on by drawing pencil lines on a piece of paper or moulded from styrene cups, and a waterfall bent out of shape by a static generator. The object he is pictured with here is filled with gin and tonic water and fluoresces under UV light. He’s the Sydney Design 09 international speaker and he’ll be delivering an illustrated lecture about his inspiration, process and work.
6pm Monday 3 August, Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. $15. Book online here.
A pop-up restaurant? Why not? Eat Green Design http://www.eatgreendesign.com/ is a purpose-built environment conceived by Collaborate’s Cilla Maden and designed by architect Hannah Tribe, with a menu of bio-dynamic and organic food devised by Danks Street Depot’s Jared Ingersoll. The concept demonstrates best practise principles in sustainable architecture and interior design, with tableware and furniture has been commissioned from Australian designers. A program of guest speakers who will lead discussion at each of the sessions will be announced shortly.
Breakfast: 8am–10am on 3, 5 and 10 August.
Brunch: 9.30am–11.30am on 2 and 9 August.
Dinner (three courses + wine): 6pm–9pm on 1, 6, 11 and 12 August.
Dinner (two courses + wine) 8pm–10pm on 4 August.
Outside these times, the venue will be open for coffee. Breakfasts or brunches are $66 a head and dinners are $110 a head. At the Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. Bookings are essential, and you can book online here.
Pauline Kiernan in a gown by Theo Haskin of Salon Milano, Melbourne, 1956. Photograph by Bruno Benini.
Bruno Benini was an Italian-born Melbourne-based fashion photographer whose archive spanning 1950 to 2001 contains wonderful fashion shots and a suite of important portraits of actors, writers, dancers, designers and artists. The archive was very recently acquired by the Powerhouse Museum and its curator, Anne-Marie Van de Ven, will share her insights into it as she works through the acquisition process. Special guests will include some of Benini’s models.
12.30pm–1.30pm Wednesday 5 August, Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. Free with museum entry.
Marcus Piper is the joint creative director of the internationally recognised creative agency one8one7 http://www.one8one7.com/
which is based on the south coast of NSW. one8one7 created the identity and campaign for Sydney Design 09. Thanks to technology and transport, Australia incubates great creative talent that works with clients around the world, as well as attracting them from overseas with our climate and lifestyle. Piper will be talking about  the benefits of working internationally and the effect the digital age has had on achieving international recognition “remotely”.
2pm-3pm Sunday 9 August, Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. Free with museum entry.
SANAA: Christian Dior building, Omotesandō, Tokyo
Two big names in Japanese architecture, Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, are the founders of the Tokyo-based SANAA (Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates). They are staging an “architectural intervention” at the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation during Sydney Design 09: a translucent curvilinear acrylic wall that meanders through the gallery creating a sense of interior/exterior space. There will be a free public forum chaired by Margaret Throsby, with speakers including Professor Leon van Schaik, Professor of Architecture (Innovation Chair) at RMIT and Yuko Hasegawa, Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo.
 3pm–5pm Saturday 15 August, Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, 16–20 Goodhope St, Paddington.

While the Sydney Design 09 festival (1–16 August) is still more than a month away, I wanted to give you advance notice of a couple of ticketed events that will sell out quickly, and some more to consider for your diary.

Paul Cocksedge

British designer Paul Cocksedge is known for innovations like lights that can be switched on by drawing pencil lines on a piece of paper or moulded from deformed styrene cups, and a waterfall warped out of shape by a static generator. The object he is pictured with here is filled with gin and tonic water and fluoresces under UV light. He’s the Sydney Design 09 international speaker and he’ll be delivering an illustrated lecture about his inspiration, process and work. 6pm Monday 3 August, Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. $15. You can book online here.

Eat Green Desgin logoA pop-up restaurant? Why not? Read the rest of this entry »

Land rites: new work by Tamara Dean

In photography on 28 June 2009 at 4:38 am

Tamara Dean, BaptismTamara Dean, Baptism

Our lives are measured in moments of ceremony, from baptism to funeral. In an increasingly secular world, these milestones take place outside the context of religion, yet our need for the ritual – and the shared sense of meaning it creates – remains.

Tamara Dean’s series Ritualism envisages these ceremonial moments in recognisably Australian landscapes, where she asks, “if bath can become baptism – if, on meditation, the mundane can take up meaning and repetition become ritual.”

Tamara Dean, The BrideTamara Dean, The Bride

In Dean’s photographs the landscape is not mere background. It is a space that, in its grandeur, creates the inspiration once reserved only for cathedrals. Read the rest of this entry »

Twisted and locked together – Dion Lee in ‘Das Superpaper’

In photography on 23 June 2009 at 2:07 am

Issue 7 of Das Superpaper has just hit the streets featuring a great interview by Jasmine O’Loughlin-Glover with Dion Lee, the designer whose debut during Rosemount Australian Fashion Week in April – at 9am in a Kings Cross underground car park – was one of the event’s buzziest high points.

Dion Lee 1

The article is illustrated with Bowen Arico’s photos, art directed by Lee and O’Loughlin-Glover, of Lee’s jackets that reinforce their intricate, sculptural quality. Lee relates them to the steel ribbon and crushed car sculptures of American John Chamberlain, saying, “What I took from looking at his work was this feeling of multiple objects being twisted and locked together. A lot of the construction is achieved through multiple pieces woven together, that can’t be separated.”

Dion Lee 2

The jackets are embellished with cylindrical glass tubing and chains, influenced by Bauhaus designer Naum Slutzky, which functions both as jewellery and a structural element, acting as a transition between panels, changing the way the fabric moves or is shaped against the body.

Read the rest of this entry »

Folding time and space

In photography on 28 May 2009 at 10:00 am

triple helix detailJennie Nayton, Triple Helix (detail) 2005

Jennie Nayton stops time in her photographs of natural, fluid forms like water and clouds, then expands the captured moment into three-dimensional space by cutting and folding the print itself.

The pattern of the folds relates to the images: waves break across the paper in undulating steps, ripples of repeated folds appear in the surface of a shallow pool, a waterfall seems to flow in a cascade of pleats down a wall.

Wave HelixJennie Nayton, Wave Helix 2005

This is intricate, fascinating work. While Nayton identifies as a photographer, her works’ sculptural aspects compels our attention, constantly changing as our point of view changes.

Read the rest of this entry »