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Archive for the ‘exhibition’ Category

Crop of the new

In exhibition, painting, photography on 19 August 2009 at 1:30 am

Three interesting shows featuring emerging artists open tomorrow around Darlinghurst in Sydney.

Kill PixieKill Pixie

At Monster Children Gallery (20 Burton St [map]), a two-man show by Kill Pixie and Cleon Peterson called The Mirror Stage. A former Sydney graffiti artist, Kill Pixie (aka Mark Whalen) now works out of Los Angeles, where his disctinctively coloured, delicate line drawing are in high demand from collectors and savvy magazine editors. Cleon Peterson is also from LA, well known for his paintings of a world where random acts of violence are the status quo. The exhibition runs until 17 September.

Cleon PetersonCleon Peterson

Anton Benoisstreet work by Anton Benois

Around the corner at Palmer Projects (238 Palmer St [map]), new works by Anton Benois and Esjay go on show under the title Bad Influence. Benois’ work is influenced by Soviet-era propaganda of his native Russia, with icons from pop culture mingling with faces from history. Painter, illustrator and designer esjay is also showing new works. The show runs until 26 August. Read the rest of this entry »

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Ten not-so-little Indian boys: new work by Michael Parekowhai

In exhibition, sculpture on 23 July 2009 at 5:17 pm

You see the first figure at the top of the staircase as soon you enter the gallery. In its scale and pose, it reminds you of nothing if not a glossy version of a cigar store Indian, the figure used for 300 years to advertise tobacconists. Its boyish, doll-like face, however, shows that Michael Parekowhai has dived into the childhood toybox once again and come out to play.

Parekowhai 1

Parekowhai’s exhibition at the Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery is titled Seldom is Herd. There are 10 of the figures in total – like the nursery song, 10 not-so-little Indians – all called The Brothers Grimm, arranged like giant toys, solo, in pairs and trios. There are also three figures of antelope standing on giant books forming oversized bookends.

Parekowhai 2

As always with Parekowhai’s work, the surfaces are seductively glossy and highly refined, almost jokey in their simplicity. But they are packed with ambiguity, attracting us with childish glee, unsettling us with their implications.

Parekowhai 3

Parekowhai’s work often plays out aspects of indigenous identity and colonialism and its representation. Rabbits, the great introduced pest species, are common motifs. So too are the players in the best known colonial drama in Western culture, Cowboys and Indians. Read the rest of this entry »

Specs appeal: Kelly Thompson’s geek girls

In exhibition, illustration on 1 July 2009 at 1:01 pm

Kelly Thompson, MaggieKelly Thompson, Maggie

Geek girls are hot because there’s nothing sexier than brains. For every geek girl who spent her formative years buckling down with school books before blossoming into a smart woman comes Kelly Thompson’s new suite of drawings.

They’re being exhibited from tomorrow night at Melbourne’s Gorker Gallery under the title Bookworms Never Go to Bed Alone.

Kelly Thompson, MaryKelly Thompson, Mary

They remind me of Alberto Vargas’ famous Varga Girls, with a 21st century attitude. In a digital world where the geeks reign supreme, these women are both sexy and empowered. Read the rest of this entry »

Heads up – five diary dates for Sydney Design 09

In architecture, exhibition, festival, graphic design, industrial design, photography on 29 June 2009 at 7:12 am
While the Sydney Design 09 festival (1–16 August) is still more than a month away, I wanted to give you advance notice of a couple of ticketed events that will sell out quickly, and some more to consider for your diary.
English lighting designer Paul Cocksedge http://www.paulcocksedge.co.uk/ is known for innovations like lights that can be switched on by drawing pencil lines on a piece of paper or moulded from styrene cups, and a waterfall bent out of shape by a static generator. The object he is pictured with here is filled with gin and tonic water and fluoresces under UV light. He’s the Sydney Design 09 international speaker and he’ll be delivering an illustrated lecture about his inspiration, process and work.
6pm Monday 3 August, Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. $15. Book online here.
A pop-up restaurant? Why not? Eat Green Design http://www.eatgreendesign.com/ is a purpose-built environment conceived by Collaborate’s Cilla Maden and designed by architect Hannah Tribe, with a menu of bio-dynamic and organic food devised by Danks Street Depot’s Jared Ingersoll. The concept demonstrates best practise principles in sustainable architecture and interior design, with tableware and furniture has been commissioned from Australian designers. A program of guest speakers who will lead discussion at each of the sessions will be announced shortly.
Breakfast: 8am–10am on 3, 5 and 10 August.
Brunch: 9.30am–11.30am on 2 and 9 August.
Dinner (three courses + wine): 6pm–9pm on 1, 6, 11 and 12 August.
Dinner (two courses + wine) 8pm–10pm on 4 August.
Outside these times, the venue will be open for coffee. Breakfasts or brunches are $66 a head and dinners are $110 a head. At the Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. Bookings are essential, and you can book online here.
Pauline Kiernan in a gown by Theo Haskin of Salon Milano, Melbourne, 1956. Photograph by Bruno Benini.
Bruno Benini was an Italian-born Melbourne-based fashion photographer whose archive spanning 1950 to 2001 contains wonderful fashion shots and a suite of important portraits of actors, writers, dancers, designers and artists. The archive was very recently acquired by the Powerhouse Museum and its curator, Anne-Marie Van de Ven, will share her insights into it as she works through the acquisition process. Special guests will include some of Benini’s models.
12.30pm–1.30pm Wednesday 5 August, Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. Free with museum entry.
Marcus Piper is the joint creative director of the internationally recognised creative agency one8one7 http://www.one8one7.com/
which is based on the south coast of NSW. one8one7 created the identity and campaign for Sydney Design 09. Thanks to technology and transport, Australia incubates great creative talent that works with clients around the world, as well as attracting them from overseas with our climate and lifestyle. Piper will be talking about  the benefits of working internationally and the effect the digital age has had on achieving international recognition “remotely”.
2pm-3pm Sunday 9 August, Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. Free with museum entry.
SANAA: Christian Dior building, Omotesandō, Tokyo
Two big names in Japanese architecture, Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, are the founders of the Tokyo-based SANAA (Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates). They are staging an “architectural intervention” at the Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation during Sydney Design 09: a translucent curvilinear acrylic wall that meanders through the gallery creating a sense of interior/exterior space. There will be a free public forum chaired by Margaret Throsby, with speakers including Professor Leon van Schaik, Professor of Architecture (Innovation Chair) at RMIT and Yuko Hasegawa, Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo.
 3pm–5pm Saturday 15 August, Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, 16–20 Goodhope St, Paddington.

While the Sydney Design 09 festival (1–16 August) is still more than a month away, I wanted to give you advance notice of a couple of ticketed events that will sell out quickly, and some more to consider for your diary.

Paul Cocksedge

British designer Paul Cocksedge is known for innovations like lights that can be switched on by drawing pencil lines on a piece of paper or moulded from deformed styrene cups, and a waterfall warped out of shape by a static generator. The object he is pictured with here is filled with gin and tonic water and fluoresces under UV light. He’s the Sydney Design 09 international speaker and he’ll be delivering an illustrated lecture about his inspiration, process and work. 6pm Monday 3 August, Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo. $15. You can book online here.

Eat Green Desgin logoA pop-up restaurant? Why not? Read the rest of this entry »

The views from here

In exhibition, video on 26 June 2009 at 12:05 am

An outstanding exhibition of video art opens today at Sydney’s Museum of Contemporary Art, fresh from its well-received season at the MCA San Diego.

The show, called Rising Tide, features film and video installations by 12 contemporary Australian artists, including Australia’s representative at the current Venice Biennale, Shaun Gladwell.

Shaun Gladwell, TangaraShaun Gladwell, Tangara (video still)

Gladwell’s work Tangara was shot on a Sydney commuter train. With Gladwell hanging from a handrail, the image is inverted and slowed down to create the effect of zero gravity which, it soon becomes apparent, is really an act of physical endurance. Like a lot of his work, Tangara combines an ordinary public space with an extraordinary action to create something approaching the sublime.

Patricia Piccinini, SandmanPatricia Piccinini, Sandman (video still)

Read the rest of this entry »

Ken Unsworth’s monumental tribute

In exhibition, sculpture on 24 June 2009 at 7:36 am

Ken Unsworth, Toyland FeverKen Unsworth, Toyland Fever

The Ken Unsworth extravaganza in the Turbine Shed on Cockatoo Island has extended its stay and will now be on show until Sunday 2 August.

Conceived as a tribute to his late wife, Elisabeth, who died in December 2008, the exhibition is one of the largest self-funded projects ever mounted by an Australian artist.

The four large-scale installations are collectively titled A Ringing Glass (Rilke), a line from Rainer Marie Rilke’s Sonnets to Orpheus:

Be here among the vanishing in the realm of entropy,
be a ringing glass that shatters as it rings.

Another space is occupied by the specially built ballroom that hosted an opulent event when the exhibition opened on 28 May. The 160 guests enjoyed a four-course dinner, a live orchestra and, thanks to the two lessons they all had to commit to, dancing. Footage from the night is being screened in the ballroom during the exhibition.

Entry to the exhibition is free, and it’s open every day from 10am to 5pm. Sydney Ferries stops at Cockatoo Island on the Balmain/Woolich and Parramatta routes – more information here.

Two from 30×40: Erin Flannery and Ben Rak

In exhibition, painting, prints on 21 June 2009 at 12:49 am
30×40 is a group exhibition currently running at United Galleries Sydney in Darlinghurst. The title refers to the size of all the works in centimetres. With 53 works commissioned from 31 artists, there’s a good mix of styles and media.
Two young artists, showing two works each, caught our eye.
Erin Flannery Monday Morning Latte Line Up
Yes, that is a peg leg in the middle. Erin Flannery says she is “highly amused by ridiculously over-sized bags and jewellery, flashy brand names, killer heels and killer trends”.
The women in her work might look cool, at first glance, even when they’re missing an arm or sporting a wooden leg which, Flannery says, will be the next big trend: “Get in before the rush.”
A self-taught artist, Flannery lives in northern NSW.
Ben Rak Decoded (All star)
Printmaker Ben Rak is showing two prints: the basketball sneakers show here and a pair of Rayban Wayfarer sunglasses on a yellow background. In these screenprints, the image is broken into vertical lines of different thickness, like the lines in the familiar scanable barcode.
Like a barcode, the lines are not random. A regular pattern can be seen repeating across the work. Intriguingly, the pattern is the same in both works, which suggests that it could be decoded, as the titles suggest. It doesn’t matter what the product is – the code remains the same.
You can see more of Rak’s print work at his website, here.
30×40 is running at United Galleries Sydney until 25 July.
Image details, from top:
Installation view, 30 x 40, United Galleries.
Erin Flannery Monday Morning Latte Line Up. Aerosol, acrylic, pencil, cotton thread on linen. 30cm x 40cm.
Ben Rak Decoded (All star), 2009. Screenprint on paper, edition of 9. 30cm x 40cm.

30x40 - United Galleries Sydney

30×40 is a group exhibition currently running at United Galleries Sydney in Darlinghurst. The title refers to the size of all the works, in centimetres. With 53 works commissioned from 31 artists, there’s a good mix of styles and media.

Two young artists showing two works each and both, coincidentally, about aspects of consumer culture, merit a closer look.

Erin Flannery - Monday Morning Latte Line UpErin Flannery Monday Morning Latte Line Up

Erin Flannery says she is “highly amused by ridiculously over-sized bags and jewellery, flashy brand names, killer heels and killer trends”.

The women in her work are arranged like models in a fashion image. On closer inspection, you see that they’re missing an arm or sporting a wooden (table) leg which, Flannery predicts, will be the next big trend: “Get in before the rush.”

A self-taught artist, Flannery lives in northern NSW. You can see more of her work at her website, here.

Ben Rak - Decoded (Allstar)Ben Rak Decoded (All star)

Read the rest of this entry »

Answered prayers

In exhibition, painting on 16 June 2009 at 9:37 am

Metro - Jackson SlatteryJackson Slattery, Our Plastic Everything is Broken

Congratulations to Jackson Slattery, who picked up $40,000 today in this year’s Metro Art Award, Australia’s richest art prize for emerging young artists.

He won with a small watercolour of Hajj pilgrims praying called Our Plastic Everything is Broken. Slattery, who is 25, is currently a studio artist at the Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, and you can see more of his work here.

Another prize of $10,000 for the public’s choice was won by Victoria Reichelt for her self-portrait, presented as shelves stacked with books.

Metro - Victoria ReicheltVictoria Reichelt Self Portrait

Also catching Kollektor’s eye were a photo-realist painting of recyclables by Peter Tankey, and Dane Lovett’s introspective self-portrait, below. Read the rest of this entry »

Want Longer Lasting Art? – Alasdair Macintyre’s ‘Playtime’

In exhibition, sculpture on 15 June 2009 at 2:03 pm

Art about art can be a risky business; art about art that is also engaged with current events even more so. In Alasdair Macintyre’s latest body of work, Playtime, art history and pop culture come together, rescued from navel gazing by his razor-sharp wit.

Macintyre 1Macintyre 2Jab 2009

His small-scale sculptures function like editorial cartoons in three dimensions, instantly accessible, engagingly strange and always funny, even when their intention is more serious.

Macintyre 3Signifier/Signified 2009

Read the rest of this entry »

Designs for living: he’s the real Ng

In exhibition, graphic design on 11 June 2009 at 3:10 am

eric_ng1

There’s a ton of talent on show in this year’s Design Now!, the annual touring exhibition of graduate student designers in six categories: design for the body, the home, the built environment, communication, studio production and industry.

Catching Kollektor’s eye was a set of booklets by Eric Ng, a visual communications graduate from the University of Technology, Sydney.

The seven booklets are based on ideas from “A Sustainable Everyday” by Ezio Manzini, a pioneer of the “slow design” movement and professor of industrial design at Milan Polytechnic. (A slideshow of Manzini’s presentation is below.)

Manzini encourages designers to play a role in creating a sustainable future by rethinking our distorted relationship with the environment at the macro level.

eric_ng2

Ng’s work, called Scenarios of a Sustainable Future, rises to Manzini’s challenge. He takes aspects of everyday life like getting up, dressing and eating, and illustrates how they could increase our well-being if we shake off our materialism.

Read the rest of this entry »